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The People of Love

SS Atma Kaur Khalsa, Newport News VA
Summer 2020

Sat Nam. I feel that Aquarian Leadership is about healing and unity. It’s the time now to work together, with circles of leadership in which we deeply respect each person’s path and journey of life and the voice of their experience. But it can be so challenging.

I’ve experienced how my heart-centered, intelligent, educated intentions can go astray in a group discussion. In one particular group that I was a part of, I spoke the truth, calmly, repeatedly. I saw some people begin to tune out and leave the group; some got louder and more aggressive; others went silent. The result: no common ground was reached. People’s views became even more polarized.

I talked with my teacher after this group took a break. My teacher listened as I expressed how I felt—that I truly saw the other points of view; that I was frustrated that I wasn’t understood; that some really wise people just wouldn’t engage; and that the few who did speak up were so polarized. Then my teacher asked me, “What did you accomplish? Did anyone heal?” I said, “No, but in the past I’ve been the person who wouldn’t speak up and I’ve learned to be one who can think fast and respond in an argument.”

Next my teacher asked, “Do you want to be right and have your voice and opinion acknowledged or do you want to be the healer?” I answered, “I want to be the healer.” In that moment I saw myself and I said, “I feel so ashamed and embarrassed.” My teacher said, “No, you have humility, humbleness.” And, yes, that’s it. This experience comes to mind and I remember that my intention is to heal.

A Prayer to Heal

My prayer is to heal—for individuals, our communities, our world. I talk with the Guru about this. I understand that we each have our journey of life and that the world is one of polarities. But I still ask the Infinite for humanity to come through and create a heart-centered world.

Either way, whatever the outcome and the choices we humans make, we, the Ministers of Sikh Dharma, are saint-warriors who must keep up, keep going, keep growing, stay Khalsa.

We have our songs to sing, the Shabd Guru to share, our many and various forms of expertise. For some of us that includes the technology of Kundalini Yoga and Meditation as taught by Yogi Bhajan. We each have our mission that we agreed to. I do get tired sometimes, discouraged, and lose patience with myself, with my family, my friends, our leaders. So I go to the Guru.

I give the Guru my tears for not being seen for who I really am, for not being understood; my frustrations for not keeping up as perfectly as I wish I could; my fears for our children’s future; my yearning for healing for our communities, for our world. Even when I cannot feel the love and support of the Guru and Adi Shakti and all seems so hopeless, I go through the steps and bow and read from the Guru. I keep doing this.

So many prayers flow. I fiercely call on my guides, asking them to please help with whatever it is I’m sensing or dealing with at the moment. And peace comes. Really profound healing. But the relief and guidance don’t always come right away—sometimes the pressure is too intense. I think of the Siri Singh Sahib talking about how diamonds are made from coal under great pressure. I think of the promise given in marriage—that we take hold of the hand, and though the head may roll, we never let go of the hand.

The People of Love

During many summers at Khalsa Women’s Training Camp, the Siri Singh Sahib would have me sit in as he counseled the many people who came to him for help, healing, and guidance. Some came thinking they were there to heal him — and left humbled and healed. Others came with a wounded body, mind or heart; I would watch and feel this incredible compassion and healing, such as I had never felt before.

As these and other memories flow through me from the 42 years that I have lived this Dharma—sometimes as the “good guy,” sometimes as the “bad guy”—finally I relax. I remember who I am: this amazing Soul on this journey of life as a human being of great heart. I feel a tinge of fear that I’ll fall and fail; then I feel the Guru and Adi Shakti rush in and I dissolve into this Love that encompasses all. We really are all One. “We are the people, the people of Love. Let us people Love today.”

About the Author

SS Atma Kaur Khalsa (Biology, B.S.), started practicing yoga at the age of 10 and has been studying, teaching and enjoying Kundalini yoga and meditation, as taught by Yogi Bhajan, since 1977. She is grateful to have personally trained with Yogi Bhajan from 1977 until his passing in 2004. Atma Kaur is a KRI-certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and graduate of the Radiant Child Yoga Program Levels 1, 2, and 3.  She is a Minister of Sikh Dharma, a Soul Answer Healer, and co-director of Guru Ram Das Ashram.  She has been married to Atma Singh for 43 years and has two children. www.atmakauryoga.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The People of Love

SS Atma Kaur Khalsa, Newport News VA
Summer 2020

Sat Nam. I feel that Aquarian Leadership is about healing and unity. It’s the time now to work together, with circles of leadership in which we deeply respect each person’s path and journey of life and the voice of their experience. But it can be so challenging.

I’ve experienced how my heart-centered, intelligent, educated intentions can go astray in a group discussion. In one particular group that I was a part of, I spoke the truth, calmly, repeatedly. I saw some people begin to tune out and leave the group; some got louder and more aggressive; others went silent. The result: no common ground was reached. People’s views became even more polarized.

I talked with my teacher after this group took a break. My teacher listened as I expressed how I felt—that I truly saw the other points of view; that I was frustrated that I wasn’t understood; that some really wise people just wouldn’t engage; and that the few who did speak up were so polarized. Then my teacher asked me, “What did you accomplish? Did anyone heal?” I said, “No, but in the past I’ve been the person who wouldn’t speak up and I’ve learned to be one who can think fast and respond in an argument.”

Next my teacher asked, “Do you want to be right and have your voice and opinion acknowledged or do you want to be the healer?” I answered, “I want to be the healer.” In that moment I saw myself and I said, “I feel so ashamed and embarrassed.” My teacher said, “No, you have humility, humbleness.” And, yes, that’s it. This experience comes to mind and I remember that my intention is to heal.

A Prayer to Heal

My prayer is to heal—for individuals, our communities, our world. I talk with the Guru about this. I understand that we each have our journey of life and that the world is one of polarities. But I still ask the Infinite for humanity to come through and create a heart-centered world.

Either way, whatever the outcome and the choices we humans make, we, the Ministers of Sikh Dharma, are saint-warriors who must keep up, keep going, keep growing, stay Khalsa.

We have our songs to sing, the Shabd Guru to share, our many and various forms of expertise. For some of us that includes the technology of Kundalini Yoga and Meditation as taught by Yogi Bhajan. We each have our mission that we agreed to. I do get tired sometimes, discouraged, and lose patience with myself, with my family, my friends, our leaders. So I go to the Guru.

I give the Guru my tears for not being seen for who I really am, for not being understood; my frustrations for not keeping up as perfectly as I wish I could; my fears for our children’s future; my yearning for healing for our communities, for our world. Even when I cannot feel the love and support of the Guru and Adi Shakti and all seems so hopeless, I go through the steps and bow and read from the Guru. I keep doing this.

So many prayers flow. I fiercely call on my guides, asking them to please help with whatever it is I’m sensing or dealing with at the moment. And peace comes. Really profound healing. But the relief and guidance don’t always come right away—sometimes the pressure is too intense. I think of the Siri Singh Sahib talking about how diamonds are made from coal under great pressure. I think of the promise given in marriage—that we take hold of the hand, and though the head may roll, we never let go of the hand.

The People of Love

During many summers at Khalsa Women’s Training Camp, the Siri Singh Sahib would have me sit in as he counseled the many people who came to him for help, healing, and guidance. Some came thinking they were there to heal him — and left humbled and healed. Others came with a wounded body, mind or heart; I would watch and feel this incredible compassion and healing, such as I had never felt before.

As these and other memories flow through me from the 42 years that I have lived this Dharma—sometimes as the “good guy,” sometimes as the “bad guy”—finally I relax. I remember who I am: this amazing Soul on this journey of life as a human being of great heart. I feel a tinge of fear that I’ll fall and fail; then I feel the Guru and Adi Shakti rush in and I dissolve into this Love that encompasses all. We really are all One. “We are the people, the people of Love. Let us people Love today.”

About the Author

SS Atma Kaur Khalsa (Biology, B.S.), started practicing yoga at the age of 10 and has been studying, teaching and enjoying Kundalini yoga and meditation, as taught by Yogi Bhajan, since 1977. She is grateful to have personally trained with Yogi Bhajan from 1977 until his passing in 2004. Atma Kaur is a KRI-certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and graduate of the Radiant Child Yoga Program Levels 1, 2, and 3.  She is a Minister of Sikh Dharma, a Soul Answer Healer, and co-director of Guru Ram Das Ashram.  She has been married to Atma Singh for 43 years and has two children. www.atmakauryoga.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

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